Recognize HIStory

Michael Jackson Forum und Archiv
 
StartseitePortalGalerieAnmeldenLogin

Teilen | 
 

 EBONY INTERVIEW

Nach unten 
AutorNachricht
wendy
Admin
Admin
avatar

Anzahl der Beiträge : 1679
Anmeldedatum : 01.09.10
Alter : 51

BeitragThema: EBONY INTERVIEW    So 19 Sep 2010 - 17:32

[Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können]

[Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können]


(Originally ran in EBONY Magazine, December 2007)

Sitting on the sofa next to Michael Jackson, you quickly look past the enigmatic icon’s light, almost translucent skin and realize that this African-American legend is more than just skin deep. More than an entertainer, more than a singer or dancer, the grown-up father of three reveals a confident, controlled and mature man who has a lot of creativity left inside him.
Michael Joseph Jackson rocked the music world in December 1982, when he exploded on the pop scene with Thriller, the rich, rhythmic, infectious album that introduced many Whites to a talent that most Blacks had known for decades, and shattered nearly every industry record on the planet. The historic project was yet another, albeit giant, step in a musical career that began 18 years earlier, at age 6, with his brothers in the Jackson 5.
In his first U.S. magazine interview in a decade and on the 25th anniversary of Thriller, Jackson sat down with Ebony magazine for a rare, intimate and exclusive conversation about the creation of Thriller, the historic Motown 25 performance, being a father, the state of the music industry and the force behind his creativity.

Here is Michael Jackson, in his own words…


Q: How did it all start?
A: Motown was preparing to do this movie called The Wiz… and Quincy Jones happened to be the man who was doing the music. Now, I had heard of Quincy before. When I was in Indiana as a child, my father used to buy jazz albums, so I knew him as a jazz musician.
So after we had made this movie––we had gotten pretty close on the film, too; he helped me understand certain words, he was really father-like––I called him after the movie, out of complete sincerity––’cause I’m a shy person, ESPECIALLY then, I used to not even look at people when they were talking to me, I’m not joking––and I said, ‘I’m ready to do an album. Do you think… could you recommend anybody who would be interested in producing it with me or working with me?’ He paused and said, ‘Why don’t you let ME do it?’ I said to myself, ‘I don’t know why I didn’t think of that.’ Probably because I was thinking that he was more my father, kind of jazzy. So after he said that, I said, ‘WOW, that would be great.’ What’s great about working with Quincy, he let’s you do your thing. He doesn’t get in the way.

So the first thing I came to him with was from Off the Wall, our first album, and Rod Temperton came in the studio, and he came with this killer––he’s this little German guy from Wurms, Germany––he comes with this … ‘doop, dakka dakka doop, dakka dakka dakka doop’, this whole melody and chorus, Rock With You. I go, WOW! So when I heard that, I said, ‘OK, I really have to work now.’ So every time Rod would present something, I would present something, and we’d form a little friendly competition. I love working like that. I used to read how Walt Disney used to, if they were working on Bambi or an animated show, they’d put a deer in the middle of the floor and make the animators kind of compete with different styles of drawing. Whoever had the most stylized effect that Walt liked, he would pick that. They would kind of compete, it was like a friendly thing, but it was competition, ’cause it breeds higher effort. So whenever Rod would bring something, I would bring something, then he would bring something, then I would bring something else. We created this wonderful thing.

Q: So, after Off the Wall, in the spring of ’82, you went back in the studio to work on Thriller.
A: After Off the Wall, we had all these No. 1 hits from it – “Don’t Stop ’Til You Get Enough,” “Rock With You,” “She’s Out of My Life,” “Workin’ Day and Night”––and we were nominated for a Grammy award, but I was just not happy with how the whole thing happened because I wanted to do much more, present much more, put more of my soul and heart in it.

Q: Was it a transition point for you?
A: A COMPLETE transition. Ever since I was a little boy, I would study composition. And it was Tchaikovsky that influenced me the most. If you take an album like Nutcracker Suite, every song is a killer, every one. So I said to myself, ‘Why can’t there be a pop album where every…’––people used to do an album where you’d get one good song, and the rest were like B-sides. They’d call them “album songs”— and I would say to myself, ‘Why can’t every one be like a hit song? Why can’t every song be so great that people would want to buy it if you could release it as a single?’ So I always tried to strive for that. That was my purpose for the next album. That was the whole idea. I wanted to just put any one out that we wanted. I worked hard for it.

Q: So, the creative process, were you deliberate about that, or did it just kind of happen?
A: No, I was pretty deliberate. Even though it all came together some kind of way, consciously, it was created in this universe, but once the right chemistry gets in the room, magic has to happen. It has to. It’s like putting certain elements in one hemisphere and it produces this magic in the other. It’s science. And getting in there with some of the great people, it’s just wonderful.
Quincy calls me a nickname, ‘Smelly.’ Smelly came from ––and [Steven] Spielberg calls me that, too. Back then, especially back then — I say a few swear words now––but especially then, you couldn’t get me to swear. So I would say, ‘That’s a “smelly” song.’ That would mean, ‘It’s so great’ that you’re engrossed in it. So he would call me ‘Smelly.’

But yeah, working with Quincy was such a wonderful thing. He lets you experiment, do your thing, and he’s genius enough to stay out of the way of the music, and if there’s an element to be added, he’ll add it. And he hears these little things. Like, for instance, in “Billie Jean,” I had come up with this piece of the bass lick, and the melody, and the whole composition. But in listening, he’ll add a nice riff…
We would work on a track and then we’d meet at his house, play what we worked on, and he would say, ‘Smelly, let it talk to you.’ I’d go, ‘OK.’ He’d say, ‘If the song needs something, it’ll tell you. Let it talk to you.’ I’ve learned to do that. The key to being a wonderful writer is not to write. You just get out of the way. Leave room for God to walk in the room. And when I write something that I know is right, I get on my knees and say thank you. Thank you, Jehovah!

Q: When’s the last time you had that feeling?

A: Well, recently. I’m always writing. When you know it’s right, sometimes you feel like something’s coming, a gestation, almost like a pregnancy or something. You get emotional, and you start to feel something gestating and, magic, there it is! It’s an explosion of something that’s so beautiful, you go, WOW! There it is. That’s how it works through you. It’s a beautiful thing. It’s a universe of where you can go, with those 12 notes…
(He’s now listening to an early, writing version of Billie Jean playing on an iPhone…)

…What I do when I write is that I’ll do a raggedy, rough version just to hear the chorus, just to see how much I like the chorus. If it works for me that way when it’s raggedy, then I know it’ll work… Listen to that, that’s at home. Janet, Randy, me… Janet and I are going “Whoo, Whoo…Whoo, Whoo…” I do that, the same process with every song. It’s the melody, the melody is most important. If the melody can sell me, if I like the rough, then I’ll go to the next step. If it sounds good in my head, it’s usually good when I do it. The idea is to transcribe from what’s in your mentality onto tape.
If you take a song like “Billie Jean,” where the bass line is the prominent, dominant piece, the protagonist of the song, the main driving riff that you hear, getting the character of that riff to be just the way you want it to be, that takes a lot of time. Listen, you’re hearing four basses on there, doing four different personalities, and that’s what gives it the character. But it takes a lot of work.

Q: Another big moment was the Motown 25 performance…
A: I was at the studio editing Beat It, and for some reason I happened to be at Motown Studios doing it––I had long left the company. So they were getting ready to do something with the Motown anniversary, and Berry Gordy came by and asked me did I want to do the show, and I told him ‘NO.’ I told him no. I said no because the Thriller thing, I was building and creating something I was planning to do, and he said, ‘But it’s the anniversary...’ So this is what I said to him. I said, ‘I will do it, but the only way I’ll do it is if you let me do one song that’s not a Motown song.’ He said, ‘What is it?’ I said, ‘Billie Jean’. He said, ‘OK, fine.’ I said, ‘You’ll really let me do “Billie Jean?” He said, ‘Yeah.’

So I rehearsed and choreographed and dressed my brothers, and picked the songs, and picked the medley. And not only that, you have to work out all the camera angles.

I direct and edit everything I do. Every shot you see is my shot. Let me tell you why I have to do it that way. I have five, no, six cameras. When you’re performing––and I don’t care what kind of performance you are giving––if you don’t capture it properly, the people will never see it. It’s the most selfish medium in the world. You’re filming WHAT you want people to see, WHEN you want them to see it, HOW you want them to see it, what JUXTAPOSITION you want them to see. You’re creating the totality of the whole feeling of what’s being presented, in your angle and your shots. ‘Cause I know what I want to see. I know what I want to go to the audience. I know what I want to come back. I know the emotion that I felt when I performed it, and I try to recapture that same emotion when I cut and edit and direct.

Q: How long have you been creating all of those elements?
A: Since I was a little boy, with my brothers. My father used to say, ‘Show ‘em Michael, show ‘em.’

Q: Did they ever get jealous of that?
A: They never showed it at the time, but it must have been hard, because I would never get spanked during rehearsals or practice. [Laughter] But afterwards was when I got in trouble. [Laughter]. It’s true, that’s when I would get it. My father would rehearse with a belt in his hand. You couldn’t mess up. My father was a genius when it comes to the way he taught us, staging, how to work an audience, anticipating what to do next, or never let the audience know if you are suffering, or if something’s going wrong. He was amazing like that.

Q: Is that where you think you got not just a lot of your business sense, but how to control the whole package?
A: Absolutely. My father, experience; but I learned a lot from my father. He had a group when he was a young person called the Falcons. They came over and they played music, all the time, so we always had music and dancing. It’s that cultural thing that Black people do. You clear out all the furniture, turn up the music…when company comes, everybody gets out in the middle of the floor, you gotta do something. I loved that.

Q: Do your kids do that now?
A: They do, but they get shy. But they do it for me, sometimes.

Q: Speaking of showmanship: MTV, they didn’t play Black folks. How hard was that for you?
A: They said they don’t play [Black artists]. It broke my heart, but at the same time it lit something. I was saying to myself, ‘I have to do something where they… I just refuse to be ignored.’ So yeah, “Billie Jean,” they said, ‘We won’t play it.’
But when they played it, it set the all-time record. Then they were asking me for EVERYTHING we had. They were knocking our door down. Then Prince came, it opened the door for Prince and all the other Black artists. It was 24-hour heavy metal, just a potpourri of crazy images…
They came to me so many times in the past and said, ‘Michael, if it wasn’t for you, there would be no MTV.’ They told me that, over and over, personally. I guess they didn’t hear it at the time…but I’m sure they didn’t mean any pure malice [laughter].

Q: That really gave birth to the modern video age…
A: I used to look at MTV. My brother [Jackie], I’ll never forget, he’d say, ‘Michael, you gotta see this channel. Oh, my God, it’s the best idea. They show music 24 hours a day… 24 Hours A Day!’ So I said, ‘Let me see this.’ And I’m watching it, I’m seeing all this stuff going on and saying ‘If only they could give this stuff some more entertainment value, more story, a little more dance, I’m sure people would love it more.’ So I said, when I do something, it’s gotta have a story––an opening, a middle and a closing––so you could follow a linear thread; there’s got to be a thread through it. So while you are watching the entertainment value of it, you’re wondering what is going to happen. So that’s when I started to experiment with Thriller, The Way You Make Me Feel and Bad and Smooth Criminal and directing and writing.

Q: What do you think about the state of music videos and music today?
A: [The industry], it’s at a crossroads. There’s a transformation going on. People are confused, what’s going to happen, how to distribute and sell music. I think the Internet kind of threw everybody for a real loop. ‘Cause it’s so powerful, kids love it so much. The whole world is at their fingertips, on their lap. Anything they want to know, anyone they want to communicate with, any music, any movies… This thing, it just took everybody for a loop. Right now, all these Starbucks deals and Wal-Mart deals, direct to artist, I don’t know if that’s the answer. I think the answer is just phenomenal, great music. Just reaching the masses. I think people are still searching. There’s not a real musical revolution going on right now, either. But when it’s there, people will break a wall down to get to it. I mean, ‘cause before Thriller, it was the same kind of thing. People were NOT buying music. It helped to bring everybody back into the stores. So, when it happens, it happens.

Q: Who impresses you?
A: As far as artistry, I think Ne-Yo is doing wonderful. But he has a very Michael Jackson feel, too. But that’s what I like about him. I can tell that he’s a guy who understands writing.

Q: Do you work with these young artists?
A: Sure. I’ve always been the type where, I don’t care if it’s the mailman or the guy sweeping the floor. If it’s a great song, it’s a great song. Some of the most ingenious ideas come from everyday people, who just go, ‘Why don’t you try this, or do this.’ It’ll be a wonderful idea, so you should just try it. Chris Brown is wonderful. Akon, he’s a wonderful artist.
I always want to do music that inspires or influences another generation. You want what you create to live, be it sculpture or painting or music. Like Michelangelo, he said, “I know the creator will go, but his work survives. That is why to escape death, I attempt to bind my soul to my work.’ And that’s how I feel. I give my all to my work. I want it to just live.

Q: How does it feel to know you have changed history? Do you think about that a lot?
A: Yeah, I do, I really do. I’m very proud that we opened doors, that it helped tear down a lot. Going around the world, doing tours, in stadiums, you see the influence of the music. When you just look out over the stage, as far as the naked eye could see, you see people. And it’s a wonderful feeling, but it came with a lot of pain, a lot of pain.

Q: How so?
A: When you’re on top of your game, when you’re a pioneer, people come at you. It’s there, who’s at the top, you want to get at them.
But I feel grateful, all those record-breaking things, to the biggest albums, to those No. 1s, I still feel grateful. I’m a guy who used to sit in my living room and listen to my father play Ray Charles. My mother used to wake me up at 3 in the morning, ‘Michael, he’s on TV, he’s on TV!’ I’d run to the TV and James Brown would be on TV. I said, ‘That’s what I want to do.’

Q: Can we expect more of Michael Jackson?
A: I’m writing a lot of stuff right now. I’m in the studio, like, every day. I think, like, the rap thing that is happening now, when it first came out, I always felt that it was gonna take more of a melodic structure to make it more universal, ‘cause not everybody speak English. [Laughter] And you are limited to your country. But when you can have a melody, and everybody can hum a melody, then that’s when it became France, The Middle East, everywhere! All over the world now ‘cause they put that melodic, linear thread in there. You have to be able to hum it, from the farmer in Ireland to the lady who scrubs toilets in Harlem to anybody who can whistle to a child poppin’ their fingers. You have to be able to hum it.

Q: So, you’re almost 50 now. Do you think you’ll be doing this at 80?
A: The truth is, umm, no. Not the way James Brown did, or Jackie Wilson did, where they just ran it out, they killed themselves. In my opinion, I wish [Brown] could have slowed down and been more relaxed and enjoyed his hard work.

Q: Will you tour again?
A: I don’t care about long tours. But what I love about touring is that it sharpens ones craft beautifully. That’s what I love about Broadway, that’s why actors turn to Broadway, to sharpen their skills. It does do that. ‘Cause it takes years to become a great entertainer. Years. You can’t just grab some guy out of obscurity and throw ‘em out there and expect for this person to compete with that person. It’ll never work. And the audience knows it; they can see it. The way they gesture their hand, move their body, the way they do anything with the microphone, or the way they bow. They can see it right away.
Now Stevie Wonder, he’s a musical prophet. He’s another guy I have to credit. I used to say to myself, ‘I want to write more.’ I used to watch [producers] Gamble and Huff, and Hal Davis and The Corporation write all those hits for the Jackson 5 and I really wanted to study the anatomy. What they used to do, they used to have us come in and sing after they did the track. I used to get upset ‘cause I would want to see them make the track. So they would give me “ABC” after the track was done, or “I Want You Back” or “The Love You Save.” I wanted to experience it all.
So Stevie Wonder used to literally let me sit like a fly on the wall. I got to see Songs in the Key of Life get made, some of the most golden things. I would sit with Marvin Gaye and just…and these would be the people who would just come over to our house and hang out and play basketball with my brothers on the weekend. We always had these people around. So when you really can see the science, the anatomy and the structure of how it all works, it’s just so wonderful.

Q: So, you play on a world stage. How do you see the shape of the world today?
A: I’m very concerned about the plight of the international global warming phenomenon. I knew it was coming, but I wish they would have gotten people’s interest sooner. But it’s never too late. It’s been described as a runaway train; if we don’t stop it, we’ll never get it back. So we have to fix it, now. That’s what I was trying to do with “Earth Song,” “Heal the World,” “We Are the World,” writing those songs to open up people’s consciousness. I wish people would listen to every word.

Q: What do you think about the next presidential race? Hillary, Barack?
A: To tell you the truth, I don’t follow that stuff. We were raised to not…we don’t look to man to fix the problems of the world, we don’t. They can’t do it. That’s how I see it. It’s beyond us. Look, we don’t have control over the grounds, they can shake. We don’t have control over the seas, they can have tsunamis. We don’t have control over the skies, there are storms. We’re all in God’s hands. I think that man has to take that into consideration. I just wish they would do more for the babies and children, help them more. That would be great, wouldn’t it?

Q: Speaking of babies, as a father now, rewind back 25 years ago. What is the difference between that Michael and the Michael today?
A: That Michael is probably the same Michael here. I just wanted to get certain things accomplished first. But I always had this tug in the back of my head, the things I wanted to do, to raise children, have children. I’m enjoying it very much.

Q: What do you think about all the stuff that’s out there about you, all the things you read? How do you feel about that?
A: I don’t pay attention to that. In my opinion, it’s ignorance. It’s usually not based on fact. It’s based on, you know, myth. The guy who you don’t get to see. Every neighborhood has the guy who you don’t see, so you gossip about him. You see those stories about him, there’s the myth that he did this or he did that. People are crazy!

I’m just about wanting to do wonderful music.

But back to Motown 25, one of the things that touched me the most about doing that was, after I did the performance––I’ll never forget. There was Marvin Gaye in the wings, and the Temptations and Smokey Robinson and my brothers, they were hugging me and kissing me and holding me. Richard Pryor walked over to me and said [in a quiet voice], ‘Now that was the greatest performance I’ve ever seen.’ That was my reward. These were people who, when I was a little boy in Indiana, I used to listen to Marvin Gaye, The Temptations, and to have them bestow that kind of appreciation on me, I was just honored. Then the next day, Fred Astaire calls and said, ‘I watched it last night, and I taped it, and I watched it again this morning. You’re a helluva mover. You put the audience on their ASS last night!’ So, later, when I saw Fred Astaire, he did this with his fingers [He makes a little moonwalk gesture with his two fingers on his outstretched palm].

I remember doing the performance so clearly, and I remembered that I was so upset with myself, ‘cause it wasn’t what I wanted. I wanted it to be more. But not until I finished. It was a little child, a little Jewish child backstage with a little tuxedo on, he looked at me, and he said [in a stunned voice] ‘Who taught you to move like that?’ [Laughter] And I said, ‘I guess God… and rehearsal.’




[Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können]


Soweit ich das beurteilen kann (weil englisch) sind das Auszüge vom Interview



Übersetzung von Neigugger aus den Rentenforum

Leider nur ein Stück da fehlt noch ziemlich viel


Übersetzung:
Neben Michael Jackson auf dem Sofa sitzend, schaust du schnell unter
die
helle, fast durchsichtige Haut dieser schillernden Ikone, und
realisierst,
daß diese afrikanisch-amerikanische Legende alles andere
als
oberflächlich ist. Mehr als nur ein Entertainer, mehr als nur ein
Sänger,
der erwachsene dreifache Vater offenbart einen selbstsicheren,
kontollierten
und reifen Mann, der noch sehr viel Kreativität in sich
birgt.
Michael Joseph Jackson hat die Musikwelt im Dezember 1982
gerockt,
als er mit Thriller in der Popszene aufschlug, dieses
vielfältige,
rhythmische, ansteckende Album, welches viele Weiße auf ein
Talent,
das den meisten Schwarzen sckon seit Jahrzehnten bekannt war,
aufmerksam
gemacht hat. Dieses Album erschütterte nahezu jede
Plattengesellschaft
auf der Welt. Dieses historische Projekt war
wiedermal ein
anderer, obgleich gigantischer, Schritt in einer
Musikkarriere, die
18 Jahre früher, im Alter von 6, mit seinen Brüdern
bei Jackson 5
begonnen hatte. In seinem ersten Interview mit einem U.S.
Magazin
seit einem Jahrzehnt und zum 25. Jahrestag von Thriller hat
Jackson
sich mit dem Ebony Magazin zusammengesetzt für ein seltenes,
intimes
und exklusives Gespräch über die Entstehung von Thriller, die
historische
Motown 25 Performance, Vaterschaft, die Situation der
Musikindustrie
und die Kraft hinter seiner Kreativität.


Zuletzt von wendy am So 3 Okt 2010 - 21:06 bearbeitet; insgesamt 1-mal bearbeitet
Nach oben Nach unten
http://recognize-history.forumieren.de
wendy
Admin
Admin
avatar

Anzahl der Beiträge : 1679
Anmeldedatum : 01.09.10
Alter : 51

BeitragThema: Re: EBONY INTERVIEW    So 19 Sep 2010 - 17:32

[Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können]


[Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können]
Nach oben Nach unten
http://recognize-history.forumieren.de
wendy
Admin
Admin
avatar

Anzahl der Beiträge : 1679
Anmeldedatum : 01.09.10
Alter : 51

BeitragThema: Re: EBONY INTERVIEW    Fr 24 Sep 2010 - 18:25

Übersetzung


Michael Jackson – mit seinen eigenen Worten
von Bryan Monroe

Übersetzung: Been Told für JacksonVillage.org - Wenn ihr das woanders postet, bitte freundlicherweise einen Link zu JacksonVillage.org mit reinstellen!
Bitte : [Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können]

Wenn man auf dem Sofa neben Michael Jackson sitzt, erkennt man sehr schnell, dass viel mehr an dieser afro-amerikanischen Legende dran ist, als die fast durchsichtig dünne Haut und die Ausstrahlung einer Ikone. Mehr als ein Entertainer, mehr als ein Sänger oder Tänzer, entpuppt sich dieser Vater von drei Kindern als ein selbstsicherer, beherrschter und reifer Mann, der noch jede Menge Kreativität in sich hat. Michael Jackson hat die Welt im Dezember 1982 gerockt, als er mit Thriller Das historische Projekt jedoch war nur ein Schritt in einer Karriere, die 18 Jahre zuvor mit für einen 6-jährigen Michael mit den Jackson 5 begonnen hatte. In seinem ersten US-Magazin Interview seit 10 Jahren, am 25. Jahrestag des Albums Thriller, setzte sich Michael Jackson mit Brian Monroe vom Ebony Magazine für ein außergewöhnliches, intimes und exklusives Gespräch zusammen. Ein Gespräch über die Entstehung von Thriller, seinem Auftritt bei Motown 25, dem Vater-sein, dem Zustand der heutigen Musikindustrie und über die treibende Kraft hinter seiner Kreativität. Hier ist Michael Jackson, in die Pop Musik Szene explodierte. Das musikalisch reiche, rhythmische und ansteckende Album, das vielen Weißen ein Talent vorstellte, das Schwarze seit Jahrzehnten kannten, und das praktisch jeden Rekord auf diesem Planeten zerschmetterte. in seinen eigenen Worten...


Ebony: Wie hat alles angefangen?

Michael: Motown bereitete sich vor, einen Film Namens "The Wiz" zu machen, und Quincy Jones war das absolute Muss für die Filmmusik. Ich hatte damals bereits von Quincy gehört. Als wir in Indiana wohnten, kaufte mein Vater viele Jazz Platten, also kannte ich ihn [Quincy] als Jazz Musiker.
Nachdem wir die Arbeit am Film beendet hatten - wir sind uns sehr nahe gekommen während der Dreharbeiten, er hat mir einige Worte erklärt und war sehr väterlich zu mir - rief ich ihn an. Einfach in voller Ehrlichkeit - ich bin ein schüchterner Mensch, vor allem damals, ich konnte Leuten beim Reden nicht mal in die Augen sehen, ohne Witz - rief ich ihn an und sagte: "Ich bin bereit, ein Album zu machen. Denkst du, du könntest mir jemanden empfehlen, der es mit mir produzieren oder mit mir arbeiten wollen würde?" Er zögerte kurz und sagte: "Warum lässt du nicht MICH das machen?"
Ich dachte mir "warum ist mir das nicht selbst eingefallen?" Wahrscheinlich weil er für mich eher ein Vater war und eher der Jazz Musiker. Nachdem er das sagte, sagte ich nur: "Wow, das wäre großartig!"
Das tolle daran, mit Quincy zu arbeiten ist, er lässt dich dein Ding machen. Er kommt dir nicht in die Quere.
Das erste, mit dem ich also zu Quincy kam, war für das Off The Wall Album. Und Rod Temperton kam dann ins Studio mit diesem Killer-Typen. Das war so ein kleiner deutscher Typ, der aus Wurms [er meint Worms, eine Stadt in der Pfalz] in Deutschland kam. Und der kam an mit diesem... "Doop, dakka, dakka, doop, dakka, dakka, dakka, doop" - die Melodie und der Refrain, Rock With You...
Ich sagte nur "Wow!" Als ich mir das angehört hatte, sagte ich: "Okay, jetzt muss ich wirklich arbeiten."
Es war dann also so, dass immer wenn Rod etwas präsentierte, ich ebenfalls etwas präsentierte. Es war eine Art freundschaftliche Konkurrenz. Ich liebe es, so zu arbeiten. Ich habe mal gelesen, wie Walt Disney, als sie zum Beispiel an Bambi arbeiteten, ein echtes Reh ins Studio stellen ließ, und die Zeichner um die Wette zeichnen lies, mit all ihren verschiedenen Stilen und Arbeitsweisen. Wer am Ende den Zeichenstil hatte, der Walt gefiel, wurde genommen. Es war wie ein Wettbewerb, zwar auf freundschaftlicher Basis, aber ein Wettbewerb und es brachte höhere Leistungen hervor. Also brachte ich jedes mal etwas, wenn Rod etwas brachte. Dann brachte er wieder etwas und ich tat es auch. Wir haben etwas wundervolles kreiert.

Ebony: Nach "Off The Wall", im Frühling 1982, sind Sie wieder ins Studio gegangen, um an Thriller zu arbeiten.

Michael: Nach Off The Wall - wir hatten all diese Nummer 1 Hits von dem Album: "Don't Stop 'Till You Get Enough", "Rock With You", "She's Out Of My Life", "Working Day And Night" - und wir wurden für einen Grammy nominiert - war ich trotzdem nicht zufrieden damit, wie das ganze abgelaufen ist.
Ich wollte viel mehr zeigen. Ich wollte da viel mehr von meinem Herz und meiner Seele reinpacken.

Ebony: War es eine Zeit des Wandels für Sie?

Michael: Voll und ganz! Ich habe seit frühester Kindheit das Komponieren von Musikstücken studiert. Und Tchaikovsky war der, der mich am meisten beeinflusste. Wenn du ein Album wie "Die Nussknacker Suite" nimmst, ist jeder einzelne Song darauf ein Killer, jeder Song. Und ich dachte mir, warum kann es nicht ein Pop Album geben, auf dem jeder... Man hat mal Alben gemacht, wo man einen wirklichen Knaller hatte und der Rest waren B-Seiten - man nannte sie auch "Album Songs". Und ich dachte mir: "Warum kann nicht jeder Song darauf ein Hit sein? Warum kann nicht jeder Song so großartig sein, dass die Leute ihn kaufen würden, wenn man ihn als Single veröffentlichen könnte?"
Ich habe auch immer versucht, genau das zu erreichen. Das war auch das, was ich mit dem nächsten Album erreichen wollte. Das war die Idee dahinter. Ich wollte, dass wir jeden Song davon [als Single] veröffentlichen könnten, den wir wollten. Dafür habe ich hart gearbeitet.

Ebony: Was den kreativen Prozess angeht, war es sehr bedacht auf dieses Ziel, oder ist es einfach so passiert?

Michael: Nein, es war sehr bedacht! Auch wenn es alles irgendwie zusammenkam, ganz bewusst, es wurde in dieser Art Universum kreiert, in dem Magie passieren muss, wenn eine bestimmte Chemie, eine Stimmung im Raum vorherrscht. Das muss einfach so sein. Es ist irgendwie, als ob man bestimmte Elemente in eine Hemisphäre packt und sie diese Magie in einer anderen auslösen. Es ist eine Wissenschaft. Und das mit einigen großartigen Leuten zu tun, ist einfach wundervoll.
Quincy hat einen Spitznamen für mich, und Steven Spielberg auch, und zwar "Smelly". Das kommt daher, dass ich - heute benutze ich schon mal einige Schimpfwörter, aber damals habe ich nie ein Schimpfwort in den Mund genommen - immer sagte "das Lied ist smelly", wenn mir ein Lied wirklich sehr gefiel und ich mich darin vertiefen konnte. Also nannten sie mich "Smelly."
Aber ja, die Arbeit mit Quincy war schon eine wundervolle Sache. Er lässt dich herumexperimentieren, lässt dich dein Ding machen und er ist genial genug, um der Musik ihren Raum zu lassen, und sich nicht in den Weg zu stellen. Und wenn es ein Element gibt, das hinzugefügt werden muss, dann tut er das. Und er hört alle möglichen kleinen Dinge. Wie zum Beispiel bei "Billie Jean". Ich habe mir die Bass-Spur, die Melodie und die ganze Komposition überlegt. Aber beim Zuhören fügte er noch einen netten Riff hinzu...
Wir arbeiteten an einem Lied und trafen uns dann bei ihm zu Hause und er spielte das Lied ab und sagte: "Smelly, lass es zu dir sprechen." Ich sagte: "Okay." Er sagte: "Wenn das Lied etwas braucht, wird es dir das sagen. Lass es zu dir sprechen." Ich habe gelernt, das zu tun. Der Schlüssel dazu, ein guter Songschreiber zu sein ist, nicht zu schreiben.
Du stellst dich einfach aus dem Weg. Du lässt Platz, um Gott in den Raum zu lassen. Und wenn ich etwas schreibe, von dem ich weiß, dass es richtig ist, knie ich nieder und sage Danke. Danke Jehova!

Ebony: Wann hatten Sie dieses Gefühl zuletzt?

Michael: Vor kurzem. Ich schreibe die ganze Zeit. Wenn man weiß, dass etwas richtig ist, etwas gut ist, dann fühlt man, wie es zu etwas wird. Fast so wie eine Schwangerschaft oder sowas. Man wird emotional und fühlt, wie etwas ensteht, heranreift. Und wie durch Magie ist es dann plötzlich da! Es ist eine Explosion von etwas, dass so wundervoll ist, dass du nur sagen kannst "WOW! Das ist es." So funktioniert es, es läuft durch dich durch. Es ist etwas wunderschönes. Es ist ein eigenes Universum, das du mit diesen 12 Noten betrittst...

(Er hört sich eine frühe Version von "Billie Jean" aus der Entstehungszeit des Songs auf einem iPhone an...)

... Was ich tue wenn ich schreibe ist, ich mache eine raue, ungefähre Version des Songs, einfach nur um den Refrain zu hören. Um zu hören, ob mir der Refrain gefällt. Wenn es mir in diesem rauen Zustand gefällt, wenn es für mich funktioniert, dann wird es funktionieren... Hören Sie sich das mal an, das ist zu Hause. Janet, Randy und ich... Janet und ich singen "Whoo, Whoo... Whoo, Whoo..." Ich führe den selben Prozess mit jedem Song durch. Es ist die Melodie, die Melodie ist am wichtigsten. Wenn ich die Melodie abkaufe, wenn sie mir in dieser rohen Fassung gefällt, gehe ich zum nächsten Schritt über. Wenn es in meinem Kopf gut klingt, ist es in der Regel auch gut, wenn ich es aufnehme. Die Aufgabe ist, das was im Kopf ist, auf ein Band zu kriegen.
Wenn man einen Song wie "Billie Jean" nimmt, bei dem der Bass die führende, prominenteste, wichtigste Rolle spielt. Er ist der Protagonist. Es ist der treibende Riff, den man hört. Diesen Riff genauso hinzubekommen, wie man ihn sich vorstellt, braucht eine Menge Zeit. Hören sie mal, sie hören hier vier verschiedene Bässe mit vier verschiedenen Persönlichkeiten. Und das gibt dem Bass den Charakter, aber es braucht eine Menge Arbeit.

Ebony: Ein weiterer großer Moment war der Auftritt bei "Motown 25".

Michael: Ich war gerade dabei, im Sudio "Beat It" zu bearbeiten. Und aus irgendeinem Grund tat ich das in den Motown Studios, obwohl ich damals die Firma schon seit Jahren verlassen hatte. Sie [Motown] bereiteten sich darauf vor, irgendwas für den Jahrestag auf die Beine zu stellen und Berry Gordy kam zu mir und fragte mich, ob ich bei der Show dabei sein wollte. Ich sagte: "NEIN." Ich sagte nein. Ich sagte nein wegen Thriller. Ich war gerade dabei, etwas Neues zu erschaffen.
Und er sagte zu mir: "Aber es ist doch der Jahrestag..." Und ich sagte folgendes zu ihm: "Ich werde es tun. Aber nur unter der Bedingung, dass du mich einen Song machen lässt, der nicht von Motown ist." Er fragte: "Welcher Song ist das?" Ich sagte: "Billie Jean." Worauf er sagte: "Okay, in Ordnung." Ich sagte: "Du wirst mich wirklich ´Billie Jean´ machen lassen?" Und er sagte: "Ja."
Also machte ich die Choreographie und probte mit meinen Brüdern. Ich suchte Outfits, die Songs und ein Medley aus. Und nicht nur das. Man muss ja auch all die verschiedenen Kamera-Einstellungen ausarbeiten. Ich bin Regisseur bei allem, was ich mache. Jede Aufnahme die man sieht, ist meine Aufnahme. Lassen Sie mich Ihnen sagen, warum ich das so machen muss. Ich habe fünf, nein sechs, Kameras. Wenn man performt - ganz egal was für eine Performance es ist - wenn du es nicht ordentlich festhältst, werden es die Leute niemals sehen. Es ist das selbstsüchtigste Medium der Welt. Du filmst WAS die Leute sehen sollen, WANN sie es sollen, WIE sie es sehen sollen, in genau der REIHENFOLGE, in der sie es sehen sollen.
Man kreiert die Gesamtheit des Feelings von dem, was präsentiert wird, mit allen [Kamera-] Einstellungen und Aufnahmen. Denn ich weiß genau, was ich sehen will. Ich weiß, was das Publikum erreichen soll. Ich weiß, was zurückkommen soll. Ich weiß, wie das Gefühl war, als ich es performte und dieses Gefühl versuche ich, wieder einzufangen, wenn ich schneide und editiere und Regie führe.

Ebony: Wie lange kreieren Sie schon all diese Elemente?

Michael: Seit ich ein kleiner Junge war, zusammen mit meinen Brüdern. Mein Vater sagte immer: "Zeig's ihnen Michael, zeig's ihnen."

Ebony: Waren sie [die Brüder] jemals neidisch deswegen?

Michael: Sie haben es damals nie gezeigt, aber es muss sehr schwierig gewesen sein, denn während der Proben wurde mir nie der Hintern versohlt. [Er lacht] Aber dafür dann danach, wenn ich Ärger machte. [Er lacht] Es ist wirklich wahr. Das waren die Gelegenheiten, an denen er das auch bei mir gemacht hat.
Mein Vater hatte immer einen Gürtel in der Hand, wenn wir probten. Es war einfach undenkbar, zu versagen. Was das anging, was er uns beibrachte, war mein Vater ein Genie. Wie man performt, wie man mit dem Publikum arbeitet, wissen, was man als nächstes tut, dem Publikum zeigen, dass man leidet, oder wenn etwas nicht stimmt. In der Hinsicht war er unglaublich.

Ebony: Würden Sie sagen, dass Sie von ihm nicht nur Ihren Sinn für das Geschäft, sondern auch das ganze Gesamtpaket bekommen haben?

Michael: Absolut. Mein Vater - all die Erfahrung. Ich lernte sehr viel von ihm. Als er jung war, hatte er eine Band mit dem Namen "The Falcons". Sie kamen oft zu uns und spielten die ganze Zeit. Wir hatten also immer Musik und Tanz im Haus. Es ist etwas kulturell typisches für Schwarze. Man räumt die ganzen Möbel aus dem Weg und dreht die Musik auf... Wenn man Besuch bekommt, sind alle in der Mitte des Raumes und man macht was. Das habe ich so geliebt.

Ebony: Machen Ihre Kinder das heutzutage auch?

Michael: Ja, aber sie sind eher schüchtern. Für mich machen sie das aber manchmal.

Ebony: Wenn wir beim Thema von Showman-sein bleiben. MTV hat keine schwarzen Künstler gezeigt, wie schwierig war das für Sie?

Michael: Sie sagten, dass sie keine [Schwarzen Leute] zeigen. Es brach mir das Herz, aber gleichermaßen entfachte es auch ein Feuer in mir.
Ich sagte zu mir selbst: "Ich muss einfach etwas auf die Beine stellen, damit sie... Ich werde es nicht zulassen, dass sie mich ignorieren." So war es also, bei "Billie Jean" haben sie gesagt: "Das spielen wir nicht."
Als sie es dann doch taten, stellte es einen Rekord auf. Dann baten sie mich um ALLES, was wir an Material hatten. Sie traten uns praktisch die Tür ein. Dann kam Prince. Es öffnete die Tür für Prince und all die anderen schwarzen Künstler. Es war vorher 24 Stunden Heavy Metal, einfach nur ein Potpourri von verrückten Bildern...
Sie kamen jetzt schon so oft an und sagten mir: "Michael, wenn du nicht gewesen wärst, gäbe es kein MTV." Sie haben mir das gesagt, immer und immer wieder, mir persönlich. Ich denke, sie haben es nicht wirklich gemerkt damals [wie das klang]... Ich bin sicher, sie wollten nicht NUR böse sein... [Er lacht]

Ebony: Das ganze war die Geburtsstunde des Zeitalters des modernen Videoclips...

Michael: Ich habe damals MTV geschaut. Mein Bruder [Jackie], ich werde das nie vergessen, sagte "Michael, dieses Programm musst du dir ansehen. Oh mein Gott, das ist die beste Idee überhaupt. Sie zeigen Musik 24 Stunden am Tag... 24 Stunden am Tag!" Also sagte ich: "Lass mich mal sehen." Ich schaue mir das alles also an und sage: "Wenn sie dem Ganzen doch bloß mehr Unterhaltungswert beifügen könnten. Mehr Story, etwas mehr Tanz... Ich bin sicher, die Leute würden es noch mehr lieben." Also sagte ich, wenn ich etwas tu, muss es eine Geschichte haben. Einen Anfang, ein Mittelstück und ein Ende. Etwas, dem man linear folgen kann. Es muss einen laufenden Faden haben. So, dass wenn man sich den Unterhaltungswert ansieht, man sich fragt, was als nächstes passiert. Dann begann ich herum zu experimentieren mit "Thriller", "The Way You Make Me Feel" und "Bad" und "Smooth Criminal" und Regie führen und Schreiben.

Ebony: Was denken Sie über den Zustand der Musikindustrie in der heutigen Zeit?

Michael: [Die Industrie] ist an einem Scheideweg angelangt. Es findet eine Verwandlung statt. Man ist unsicher darüber, was passieren wird und wie man Musik veröffentlichen soll. Ich glaube, das Internet hat die Leute richtig aus der Bahn geworfen. Denn es ist so mächtig, und die Kids lieben es so. Die ganze Welt ist immer direkt zur Hand, auf ihrem Schoß. Alles was sie wissen wollen, jeder mit dem sie kommunizieren möchten, jede Art von Musik, oder Filme... Das hat die Leute richtig überrannt. Diese jetzigen Starbucks Deals und die Walmart Deals, ich weiß nicht, ob das die richtige Antwort ist. Ich glaube, die Antwort ist phänomenale, großartige Musik. Die Massen erreichen. Ich glaube, die Leute suchen immer noch. Es gibt im Moment auch keine wirkliche musikalische Revolution. Aber wenn sie kommt, werden die Leute Wände einreißen, um zu ihr zu gelangen.
Vor "Thriller" war es ja auch so. Die Leute haben einfach keine Musik gekauft. Es hat allen geholfen, wieder in die Läden zu kommen. Wenn also etwas passiert, dann PASSIERT's.

Ebony: Wer beeindruckt Sie?

Michael: Was das Künstlerische angeht, finde ich dass Ne-Yo wundervolle Arbeit leistet. Er hat aber einen sehr Michael Jackson-mäßigen Stil. Andererseits gefällt mir gerade das bei ihm. Ich sehe, dass er jemand ist, der das [Song] Schreiben versteht.

Ebony: Arbeiten Sie mit diesen jungen Künstlern?

Michael: Sicher. Ich hatte schon immer die Einstellung, dass es egal ist, ob es von einem Briefträger oder jemandem, der den Boden kehrt kommt. Ein großartiger Song ist ein großartiger Song. Die tollsten Ideen kommen von ganz normalen Leuten, die einfach nur sagen "Warum probierst du nicht das hier mal aus? Oder jenes hier." Es ist eine tolle Idee, also probiert man sie aus.
Chris Brown ist wundervoll. Akon, er ist ein toller Künstler. Ich wollte immer Musik machen, die eine Generation beeinflusst und inspiriert. Man will dass das, was man kreiert auch lebt. Egal ob es eine Skulptur, ein Gemälde oder Musik ist. Wie Michelangelo sagte: "Ich weiß, der Schöpfer wird irgendwann gehen, aber seine Arbeit lebt weiter. Deshalb stecke ich meine ganze Seele in meine Kunst, um dem Tod zu entrinnen."
Und genauso geht es mir auch. Ich stecke alles von mir in meine Arbeit, denn ich will dass sie lebt.

Ebony: Was für ein Gefühl ist es, zu wissen, dass man die Geschichte verändert hat? Denken Sie oft darüber nach?

Michael: Ja das tue ich, das tue ich wirklich. Ich bin sehr stolz darauf, dass wir Türen geöffnet haben, dass es geholfen hat, vieles nieder zu reißen. Wenn man um die Welt reist und durch die Stadien tourt, sieht man den Einfluss der Musik. Wenn man von der Bühne auf die Menschenmenge sieht, die so groß ist wie das Auge reicht. Es ist ein großartiges Gefühl, aber es kostete auch viel, viel Schmerz.

Ebony: In wiefern?

Michael: Wenn du ganz oben bist, wenn du ein Pionier bist, wollen die Leute dir was. Es ist einfach so. Wer oben ist, dem will man was. Aber ich bin sehr dankbar. All die Rekorde, die best-verkauften Alben, die Nummer 1 Hits - ich bin immer noch dankbar. Ich bin ein Typ, der im Wohnzimmer saß und zuhörte, während mein Vater Ray Charles Platten abspielte. Meine Mutter weckte mich, manchmal um 3 Uhr nachts: "Michael, er ist im Fernsehen, er ist im Fernsehen!" Ich stand auf und rannte zum Fernseher, und da war James Brown. Und ich sagte: "Das will ich auch tun."

Ebony: Können wir uns auf mehr von Michael Jackson freuen?

Michael: Ich schreibe sehr viel im Moment. Ich bin praktisch jeden Tag im Studio. Ich glaube, als Rap anfing - als es losging, dachte ich immer, dass es eine melodischere Wendung nehmen würde. Um es universeller zu machen, denn nicht jeder spricht Englisch. [Er lacht] Und man ist auf sein Land beschränkt. Aber wenn man eine Melodie hat und die Leute können sie mitsummen, dann geht's nach Frankreich, zum Mittleren Osten, überall hin! Überall auf der Welt, denn jetzt fügt man diesen linearen Faden in die Lieder ein. Man muss mitsummen können. Vom irischen Farmer, bis zur Lady, die in Harlem Toiletten schrubbt, bis zu jedem, der mitpfeifen kann, bis zum Kind dass mitschnippt. Man muss es mitsummen können.

Ebony: Sie sind jetzt fast 50. Glauben Sie, Sie werden das hier noch mit 80 machen?

Michael: Ganz ehrlich? Hm, nein. Nicht wie es James Brown tat, oder Jackie Wilson. Sie haben sich einfach totgearbeitet. Ich hätte mir gewünscht, dass [James Brown] am Ende etwas langsamer gemacht und etwas relaxt hätte. So hätte er die Ergebnisse seiner harten Arbeit genießen können.

Ebony: Werden Sie wieder auf Tour gehen?

Michael: Ich mag keine langen Tourneen. Was ich aber am Touren liebe ist, dass es deine Fähigkeiten verfeinert. Das liebe ich am Broadway. Deshalb wenden sich auch Schauspieler dem Broadway zu - weil es das Handwerk verfeinert. Das tut es wirklich. Denn man braucht Jahre, um ein großartiger Entertainer zu werden. Jahre. Man kann nicht einfach jemanden aus der Menge nehmen und ihn in diese Welt werfen und erwarten, dass er mithalten kann. Das würde nie funktionieren. Und das Publikum weiß das, es sieht das. Wie man eine Handbewegung macht, wie man seinen Körper bewegt, wie man mit dem Mikro umgeht, und wie man sich verbeugt. Sie sehen es sofort.
Stevie Wonder zum Beispiel ist ein musikalischer Prophet. Er ist ein weiterer Mensch, den ich benennen muss. Ich habe mir immer gesagt, ich muss mehr schreiben. Ich sah mir [die Produzenten] Gamble und Huff und Hal Davis und die Corporation an, wie sie Hits für die Jackson 5 schrieben. Und ich wollte wirklich die Anatomie davon studieren. Was immer geschah war, dass sie uns holten, um ein Lied zu singen, nachdem sie es fertiggestellt hatten. Und ich war immer traurig, denn ich wollte sehen, wie sie das Lied erstellten. Sie gaben mir also "ABC" nachdem es fertig war, oder "I Want You Back" oder "The Love You Save." Ich wollte es alles erleben.
Und Stevie Wonder ließ mich sprichwörtlich wie die Fliege an der Wand dabeisitzen. So kam es dazu, dass ich dem Album "Songs In The Key Of Life" beim Entstehen zusah - einigen der großartigsten Lieder. Oder ich saß bei Marvin Gaye und... Und das war so die Art Leute, die einfach zu uns kamen und mit uns rumgehangen sind, und mit meinen Brüdern und mir an Wochenenden Basketball spielten. Wir hatten diese Leute immer da. So sah man also die Anatomie und Wissenschaft davon, wie das alles funktioniert, einfach großartig.

Ebony: Sie spielen ja auf einer Weltbühne. Wie sehen Sie die heutige Welt?

Michael: Ich bin sehr besorgt wegen der globalen Erderwärmung. Ich wußte, dass es anstand, aber ich wünschte, man hätte die Aufmerksamkeit der Leute früher bekommen. Es ist aber nie zu spät. Man sagt es ist wie ein außer Kontrolle geratener Zug. Wenn man ihn nicht gleich anhält, kriegt man ihn nie unter Kontrolle. Also müssen wir's in Ordnung bringen und zwar jetzt. Das ist es, was ich mit Liedern wie "Earthsong", "Heal The World" und "We Are The World" bewirken wollte, dass sich das Bewusstsein der Leute dafür öffnet. Ich wünschte, die Leute würden jedem der Worte genau zuhören.

Ebony: Was sind Ihre Gedanken zum Thema Präsidentschaftswahl? Hillary, Barrack?

Michael: Um die Wahrheit zu sagen, verfolge ich das nicht. Wir wurden so erzogen. Wenn wir nach den Lösungen der Probleme Welt suchen, suchen wir nicht unter Menschen. Denn sie können es nicht lösen, so sehe ich das. Wir können die Meere nicht kontrollieren, denn so ein Tsunami ist nicht kontrollierbar, es passiert einfach. Wir haben keine Kontrolle über den Himmel, denn wir können die Stürme nicht kontrollieren, sie passieren einfach. Wir sind alle in Gottes Hand und ich denke, dass die Menschheit das bedenken sollte. Ich wünsche mir, dass man mehr für Babys und Kinder tun würde. Das wäre doch großartig, oder?

Ebony: Apropos Babys. Als Vater, schauen Sie doch mal in die Vergangenheit, so 25 Jahre, und sagen Sie uns, was der Unterschied ist, zwischen dem Michael damals und dem Michael heute.

Michael: Der Michael damals ist wohl der selbe Michael wie hier und heute. Ich wollte halt schon immer einige Dinge erreichen. Aber ich hatte auch immer im Hinterkopf, dass ich Kinder haben wollte. Und ich genieße es sehr.

Ebony: Was denken Sie darüber, was man so über Sie schreibt. Was halten Sie davon?

Michael: Ich beachte das nicht. Meiner Meinung nach ist es Ignoranz. Es ist gewöhnlich nicht in Fakten verankert. Es basiert eher, wissen sie, auf Mythos. Der Typ, den man nie wahrhaftig sehen kann. Jede Nachbarschaft hat einen Typen, den man nicht viel sieht. Und über den wird dann hergezogen und getratscht. Es gibt dann Geschichten über ihn, dass er dies oder jenes getan hat. Die Leute sind verrückt!
Ich will einfach nur großartige Musik machen, das ist es, was mich ausmacht.
Aber um nochmal auf Motown 25 zurück zu kommen. Etwas, das mich am meisten berührt hat an der ganzen Sache, das fand nach dem Auftritt statt - ich werde das nie vergessen. Marvin Gaye war backstage und The Temptations und Smokey Robinson und meine Brüder. Sie alle umarmten und küssten mich. Und Richard Pryor kam zu mir und sagte [in einer leisen Stimme]: "Das war der großartigste Auftritt, den ich jemals gesehen habe."
Das war meine Belohnung. Das waren alles Leute, deren Sachen ich mir als Kind in Indiana immer anhörte. Marvin Gaye, The Temptations... Und dass sie mir solche Anerkennung schenken, ich war einfach nur sehr geehrt.
Am nächsten Tag rief Fred Astaire an und sagte: "Ich hab dich gestern gesehen. Ich habe es aufgenommen und habe es mir heute Morgen wieder angesehen. Du bist ein höllisch guter Tänzer! Du hast die Leute gestern Abend vom Hocker gerissen!" Und als ich dann später Fred Astaire sah, macht er die Bewegung mit den Fingern [Michael macht den Moonwalk mit zwei Fingern auf seiner ausgestreckten Hand].
Ich weiß noch ganz genau, wie ich die Performance gemacht habe. Und ich war so enttäuscht hinterher, denn es war nicht so wie ich es wollte. Ich wollte dass es mehr gewesen wäre. Aber nachdem ich dann fertig war, traf ich backstage einen kleinen jüdischen Jungen in einem kleinen Smoking, und er fragte mich [in gebannter Stimme] "Wer hat dir beigebracht, dich so zu bewegen!" [Er lacht] und ich sagte: "Ich denke, Gott... und Übung."

Übersetzung: Been Told für JacksonVillage.org - Wenn ihr das woanders postet, bitte freundlicherweise einen Link zu JacksonVillage.org mit reinstellen!
Bitte : [Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können]
Nach oben Nach unten
http://recognize-history.forumieren.de
wendy
Admin
Admin
avatar

Anzahl der Beiträge : 1679
Anmeldedatum : 01.09.10
Alter : 51

BeitragThema: Re: EBONY INTERVIEW    Mi 6 Okt 2010 - 2:58

Michael Jackson - mit seinen eigenen Worten
Wenn man auf dem Sofa neben Michael Jackson sitzt, erkennt man sehr schnell, dass viel mehr an dieser afro-amerikanischen Legende dran ist, als die fast durchsichtig dünne Haut und die Ausstrahlung einer Ikone. Mehr als ein Entertainer, mehr als ein Sänger oder Tänzer, entpuppt sich dieser Vater von drei Kindern als ein selbstsicherer, beherrschter und reifer Mann, der noch jede Menge Kreativität in sich hat. Michael Jackson hat die Welt im Dezember 1982 gerockt, als er mit Thriller Das historische Projekt jedoch war nur ein Schritt in einer Karriere, die 18 Jahre zuvor mit für einen 6-jährigen Michael mit den Jackson 5 begonnen hatte. In seinem ersten US-Magazin Interview seit 10 Jahren, am 25. Jahrestag des Albums Thriller, setzte sich Michael Jackson mit Brian Monroe vom Ebony Magazine für ein außergewöhnliches, intimes und exklusives Gespräch zusammen. Ein Gespräch über die Entstehung von Thriller, seinem Auftritt bei Motown 25, dem Vater-sein, dem Zustand der heutigen Musikindustrie und über die treibende Kraft hinter seiner Kreativität. Hier ist Michael Jackson, in die Pop Musik Szene explodierte. Das musikalisch reiche, rhythmische und ansteckende Album, das vielen Weißen ein Talent vorstellte, das Schwarze seit Jahrzehnten kannten, und das praktisch jeden Rekord auf diesem Planeten zerschmetterte. in seinen eigenen Worten...


Ebony: Wie hat alles angefangen?

Michael: Motown bereitete sich vor, einen Film Namens "The Wiz" zu machen, und Quincy Jones war das absolute Muss für die Filmmusik. Ich hatte damals bereits von Quincy gehört. Als wir in Indiana wohnten, kaufte mein Vater viele Jazz Platten, also kannte ich ihn [Quincy] als Jazz Musiker.
Nachdem wir die Arbeit am Film beendet hatten - wir sind uns sehr nahe gekommen während der Dreharbeiten, er hat mir einige Worte erklärt und war sehr väterlich zu mir - rief ich ihn an. Einfach in voller Ehrlichkeit - ich bin ein schüchterner Mensch, vor allem damals, ich konnte Leuten beim Reden nicht mal in die Augen sehen, ohne Witz - rief ich ihn an und sagte: "Ich bin bereit, ein Album zu machen. Denkst du, du könntest mir jemanden empfehlen, der es mit mir produzieren oder mit mir arbeiten wollen würde?" Er zögerte kurz und sagte: "Warum lässt du nicht MICH das machen?"
Ich dachte mir "warum ist mir das nicht selbst eingefallen?" Wahrscheinlich weil er für mich eher ein Vater war und eher der Jazz Musiker. Nachdem er das sagte, sagte ich nur: "Wow, das wäre großartig!"
Das tolle daran, mit Quincy zu arbeiten ist, er lässt dich dein Ding machen. Er kommt dir nicht in die Quere.

Das erste, mit dem ich also zu Quincy kam, war für das Off The Wall Album. Und Rod Temperton kam dann ins Studio mit diesem Killer-Typen. Das war so ein kleiner deutscher Typ, der aus Wurms [er meint Worms, eine Stadt in der Pfalz] in Deutschland kam. Und der kam an mit diesem... "Doop, dakka, dakka, doop, dakka, dakka, dakka, doop" - die Melodie und der Refrain, Rock With You...
Ich sagte nur "Wow!" Als ich mir das angehört hatte, sagte ich: "Okay, jetzt muss ich wirklich arbeiten."

Es war dann also so, dass immer wenn Rod etwas präsentierte, ich ebenfalls etwas präsentierte. Es war eine Art freundschaftliche Konkurrenz. Ich liebe es, so zu arbeiten. Ich habe mal gelesen, wie Walt Disney, als sie zum Beispiel an Bambi arbeiteten, ein echtes Reh ins Studio stellen ließ, und die Zeichner um die Wette zeichnen lies, mit all ihren verschiedenen Stilen und Arbeitsweisen. Wer am Ende den Zeichenstil hatte, der Walt gefiel, wurde genommen. Es war wie ein Wettbewerb, zwar auf freundschaftlicher Basis, aber ein Wettbewerb und es brachte höhere Leistungen hervor. Also brachte ich jedes mal etwas, wenn Rod etwas brachte. Dann brachte er wieder etwas und ich tat es auch. Wir haben etwas wundervolles kreiert.

Ebony: Nach "Off The Wall", im Frühling 1982, sind Sie wieder ins Studio gegangen, um an Thriller zu arbeiten.

Michael: Nach Off The Wall - wir hatten all diese Nummer 1 Hits von dem Album: "Don't Stop 'Till You Get Enough", "Rock with you", "She's Out Of My Life", "Working day and night" - und wir wurden für einen Grammy nominiert - war ich trotzdem nicht zufrieden damit, wie das ganze abgelaufen ist.
Ich wollte viel mehr zeigen. Ich wollte da viel mehr von meinem Herz und meiner Seele reinpacken.

Ebony: War es eine Zeit des Wandels für Sie?

Michael: Voll und ganz! Ich habe seit frühester Kindheit das Komponieren von Musikstücken studiert. Und Tchaikovsky war der, der mich am meisten beeinflusste. Wenn du ein Album wie "Die Nussknacker Suite" nimmst, ist jeder einzelne Song darauf ein Killer, jeder Song. Und ich dachte mir, warum kann es nicht ein Pop Album geben, auf dem jeder... Man hat mal Alben gemacht, wo man einen wirklichen Knaller hatte und der Rest waren B-Seiten - man nannte sie auch "Album Songs". Und ich dachte mir: "Warum kann nicht jeder Song darauf ein Hit sein? Warum kann nicht jeder Song so großartig sein, dass die Leute ihn kaufen würden, wenn man ihn als Single veröffentlichen könnte?"
Ich habe auch immer versucht, genau das zu erreichen. Das war auch das, was ich mit dem nächsten Album erreichen wollte. Das war die Idee dahinter. Ich wollte, dass wir jeden Song davon [als Single] veröffentlichen könnten, den wir wollten. Dafür habe ich hart gearbeitet.

Ebony: Was den kreativen Prozess angeht, war es sehr bedacht auf dieses Ziel, oder ist es einfach so passiert?

Michael: Nein, es war sehr bedacht! Auch wenn es alles irgendwie zusammenkam, ganz bewusst, es wurde in dieser Art Universum kreiert, in dem Magie passieren muss, wenn eine bestimmte Chemie, eine Stimmung im Raum vorherrscht. Das muss einfach so sein. Es ist irgendwie, als ob man bestimmte Elemente in eine Hemisphäre packt und sie diese Magie in einer anderen auslösen. Es ist eine Wissenschaft. Und das mit einigen großartigen Leuten zu tun, ist einfach wundervoll.

Quincy hat einen Spitznamen für mich, und Steven Spielberg auch, und zwar "Smelly". Das kommt daher, dass ich - heute benutze ich schon mal einige Schimpfwörter, aber damals habe ich nie ein Schimpfwort in den Mund genommen - immer sagte "das Lied ist smelly", wenn mir ein Lied wirklich sehr gefiel und ich mich darin vertiefen konnte. Also nannten sie mich "Smelly."
Aber ja, die Arbeit mit Quincy war schon eine wundervolle Sache. Er lässt dich herumexperimentieren, lässt dich dein Ding machen und er ist genial genug, um der Musik ihren Raum zu lassen, und sich nicht in den Weg zu stellen. Und wenn es ein Element gibt, das hinzugefügt werden muss, dann tut er das. Und er hört alle möglichen kleinen Dinge. Wie zum Beispiel bei "Billie Jean". Ich habe mir die Bass-Spur, die Melodie und die ganze Komposition überlegt. Aber beim Zuhören fügte er noch einen netten Riff hinzu...

Wir arbeiteten an einem Lied und trafen uns dann bei ihm zu Hause und er spielte das Lied ab und sagte: "Smelly, lass es zu dir sprechen." Ich sagte: "Okay." Er sagte: "Wenn das Lied etwas braucht, wird es dir das sagen. Lass es zu dir sprechen." Ich habe gelernt, das zu tun. Der Schlüssel dazu, ein guter Songschreiber zu sein ist, nicht zu schreiben.
Du stellst dich einfach aus dem Weg. Du lässt Platz, um Gott in den Raum zu lassen. Und wenn ich etwas schreibe, von dem ich weiß, dass es richtig ist, knie ich nieder und sage Danke. Danke Jehova!

Ebony: Wann hatten Sie dieses Gefühl zuletzt?

Michael: Vor kurzem. Ich schreibe die ganze Zeit. Wenn man weiß, dass etwas richtig ist, etwas gut ist, dann fühlt man, wie es zu etwas wird. Fast so wie eine Schwangerschaft oder sowas. Man wird emotional und fühlt, wie etwas ensteht, heranreift. Und wie durch Magie ist es dann plötzlich da! Es ist eine Explosion von etwas, dass so wundervoll ist, dass du nur sagen kannst "WOW! Das ist es." So funktioniert es, es läuft durch dich durch. Es ist etwas wunderschönes. Es ist ein eigenes Universum, das du mit diesen 12 Noten betrittst...

(Er hört sich eine frühe Version von "Billie Jean" aus der Entstehungszeit des Songs auf einem iPhone an...)

... Was ich tue wenn ich schreibe ist, ich mache eine raue, ungefähre Version des Songs, einfach nur um den Refrain zu hören. Um zu hören, ob mir der Refrain gefällt. Wenn es mir in diesem rauen Zustand gefällt, wenn es für mich funktioniert, dann wird es funktionieren... Hören Sie sich das mal an, das ist zu Hause. Janet, Randy und ich... Janet und ich singen "Whoo, Whoo... Whoo, Whoo..." Ich führe den selben Prozess mit jedem Song durch. Es ist die Melodie, die Melodie ist am wichtigsten. Wenn ich die Melodie abkaufe, wenn sie mir in dieser rohen Fassung gefällt, gehe ich zum nächsten Schritt über. Wenn es in meinem Kopf gut klingt, ist es in der Regel auch gut, wenn ich es aufnehme. Die Aufgabe ist, das was im Kopf ist, auf ein Band zu kriegen.
Wenn man einen Song wie "Billie Jean" nimmt, bei dem der Bass die führende, prominenteste, wichtigste Rolle spielt. Er ist der Protagonist. Es ist der treibende Riff, den man hört. Diesen Riff genauso hinzubekommen, wie man ihn sich vorstellt, braucht eine Menge Zeit. Hören sie mal, sie hören hier vier verschiedene Bässe mit vier verschiedenen Persönlichkeiten. Und das gibt dem Bass den Charakter, aber es braucht eine Menge Arbeit.

Ebony: Ein weiterer großer Moment war der Auftritt bei "Motown 25".

Michael: Ich war gerade dabei, im Sudio "Beat it" zu bearbeiten. Und aus irgendeinem Grund tat ich das in den Motown Studios, obwohl ich damals die Firma schon seit Jahren verlassen hatte. Sie [Motown] bereiteten sich darauf vor, irgendwas für den Jahrestag auf die Beine zu stellen und Berry Gordy kam zu mir und fragte mich, ob ich bei der Show dabei sein wollte. Ich sagte: "NEIN." Ich sagte nein. Ich sagte nein wegen Thriller. Ich war gerade dabei, etwas Neues zu erschaffen.
Und er sagte zu mir: "Aber es ist doch der Jahrestag..." Und ich sagte folgendes zu ihm: "Ich werde es tun. Aber nur unter der Bedingung, dass du mich einen Song machen lässt, der nicht von Motown ist."

Er fragte: "Welcher Song ist das?" Ich sagte: "Billie Jean." Worauf er sagte: "Okay, in Ordnung." Ich sagte: "Du wirst mich wirklich ´Billie Jean´ machen lassen?" Und er sagte: "Ja."
Also machte ich die Choreographie und probte mit meinen Brüdern. Ich suchte Outfits, die Songs und ein Medley aus. Und nicht nur das. Man muss ja auch all die verschiedenen Kamera-Einstellungen ausarbeiten. Ich bin Regisseur bei allem, was ich mache. Jede Aufnahme die man sieht, ist meine Aufnahme. Lassen Sie mich Ihnen sagen, warum ich das so machen muss. Ich habe fünf, nein sechs, Kameras. Wenn man performt - ganz egal was für eine Performance es ist - wenn du es nicht ordentlich festhältst, werden es die Leute niemals sehen. Es ist das selbstsüchtigste Medium der Welt. Du filmst WAS die Leute sehen sollen, WANN sie es sollen, WIE sie es sehen sollen, in genau der REIHENFOLGE, in der sie es sehen sollen.
Man kreiert die Gesamtheit des Feelings von dem, was präsentiert wird, mit allen [Kamera-] Einstellungen und Aufnahmen. Denn ich weiß genau, was ich sehen will. Ich weiß, was das Publikum erreichen soll. Ich weiß, was zurückkommen soll. Ich weiß, wie das Gefühl war, als ich es performte und dieses Gefühl versuche ich, wieder einzufangen, wenn ich schneide und editiere und Regie führe.

Ebony: Wie lange kreieren Sie schon all diese Elemente?

Michael: Seit ich ein kleiner Junge war, zusammen mit meinen Brüdern. Mein Vater sagte immer: "Zeig's ihnen Michael, zeig's ihnen."

Ebony: Waren sie [die Brüder] jemals neidisch deswegen?

Michael: Sie haben es damals nie gezeigt, aber es muss sehr schwierig gewesen sein, denn während der Proben wurde mir nie der Hintern versohlt. [Er lacht] Aber dafür dann danach, wenn ich Ärger machte. [Er lacht] Es ist wirklich wahr. Das waren die Gelegenheiten, an denen er das auch bei mir gemacht hat.
Mein Vater hatte immer einen Gürtel in der Hand, wenn wir probten. Es war einfach undenkbar, zu versagen. Was das anging, was er uns beibrachte, war mein Vater ein Genie. Wie man performt, wie man mit dem Publikum arbeitet, wissen, was man als nächstes tut, dem Publikum zeigen, dass man leidet, oder wenn etwas nicht stimmt. In der Hinsicht war er unglaublich.

Ebony: Würden Sie sagen, dass Sie von ihm nicht nur Ihren Sinn für das Geschäft, sondern auch das ganze Gesamtpaket bekommen haben?

Michael: Absolut. Mein Vater - all die Erfahrung. Ich lernte sehr viel von ihm. Als er jung war, hatte er eine Band mit dem Namen "The Falcons". Sie kamen oft zu uns und spielten die ganze Zeit. Wir hatten also immer Musik und Tanz im Haus. Es ist etwas kulturell typisches für Schwarze. Man räumt die ganzen Möbel aus dem Weg und dreht die Musik auf... Wenn man Besuch bekommt, sind alle in der Mitte des Raumes und man macht was. Das habe ich so geliebt.

Ebony: Machen Ihre Kinder das heutzutage auch?

Michael: Ja, aber sie sind eher schüchtern. Für mich machen sie das aber manchmal.

Ebony: Wenn wir beim Thema von Showman-sein bleiben. MTV hat keine schwarzen Künstler gezeigt, wie schwierig war das für Sie?

Michael: Sie sagten, dass sie keine [Schwarzen Leute] zeigen. Es brach mir das Herz, aber gleichermaßen entfachte es auch ein Feuer in mir.
Ich sagte zu mir selbst: "Ich muss einfach etwas auf die Beine stellen, damit sie... Ich werde es nicht zulassen, dass sie mich ignorieren." So war es also, bei "Billie Jean" haben sie gesagt: "Das spielen wir nicht."
Als sie es dann doch taten, stellte es einen Rekord auf. Dann baten sie mich um ALLES, was wir an Material hatten. Sie traten uns praktisch die Tür ein. Dann kam Prince. Es öffnete die Tür für Prince und all die anderen schwarzen Künstler. Es war vorher 24 Stunden Heavy Metal, einfach nur ein Potpourri von verrückten Bildern...
Sie kamen jetzt schon so oft an und sagten mir: "Michael, wenn du nicht gewesen wärst, gäbe es kein MTV." Sie haben mir das gesagt, immer und immer wieder, mir persönlich. Ich denke, sie haben es nicht wirklich gemerkt damals [wie das klang]... Ich bin sicher, sie wollten nicht NUR böse sein... [Er lacht]

Ebony: Das ganze war die Geburtsstunde des Zeitalters des modernen Videoclips...

Michael: Ich habe damals MTV geschaut. Mein Bruder [Jackie], ich werde das nie vergessen, sagte "Michael, dieses Programm musst du dir ansehen. Oh mein Gott, das ist die beste Idee überhaupt. Sie zeigen Musik 24 Stunden am Tag... 24 Stunden am Tag!" Also sagte ich: "Lass mich mal sehen." Ich schaue mir das alles also an und sage: "Wenn sie dem Ganzen doch bloß mehr Unterhaltungswert beifügen könnten. Mehr Story, etwas mehr Tanz... Ich bin sicher, die Leute würden es noch mehr lieben." Also sagte ich, wenn ich etwas tu, muss es eine Geschichte haben. Einen Anfang, ein Mittelstück und ein Ende. Etwas, dem man linear folgen kann. Es muss einen laufenden Faden haben. So, dass wenn man sich den Unterhaltungswert ansieht, man sich fragt, was als nächstes passiert. Dann begann ich herum zu experimentieren mit "Thriller", "The way you make me feel" und "Bad" und "Smooth Criminal" und Regie führen und Schreiben.

Ebony: Was denken Sie über den Zustand der Musikindustrie in der heutigen Zeit?

Michael: [Die Industrie] ist an einem Scheideweg angelangt. Es findet eine Verwandlung statt. Man ist unsicher darüber, was passieren wird und wie man Musik veröffentlichen soll. Ich glaube, das Internet hat die Leute richtig aus der Bahn geworfen. Denn es ist so mächtig, und die Kids lieben es so. Die ganze Welt ist immer direkt zur Hand, auf ihrem Schoß. Alles was sie wissen wollen, jeder mit dem sie kommunizieren möchten, jede Art von Musik, oder Filme... Das hat die Leute richtig überrannt. Diese jetzigen Starbucks Deals und die Walmart Deals, ich weiß nicht, ob das die richtige Antwort ist. Ich glaube, die Antwort ist phänomenale, großartige Musik. Die Massen erreichen. Ich glaube, die Leute suchen immer noch. Es gibt im Moment auch keine wirkliche musikalische Revolution. Aber wenn sie kommt, werden die Leute Wände einreißen, um zu ihr zu gelangen.
Vor "Thriller" war es ja auch so. Die Leute haben einfach keine Musik gekauft. Es hat allen geholfen, wieder in die Läden zu kommen. Wenn also etwas passiert, dann PASSIERT's.

Ebony: Wer beeindruckt Sie?

Michael: Was das Künstlerische angeht, finde ich dass Ne-Yo wundervolle Arbeit leistet. Er hat aber einen sehr Michael Jackson-mäßigen Stil. Andererseits gefällt mir gerade das bei ihm. Ich sehe, dass er jemand ist, der das [Song] Schreiben versteht.

Ebony: Arbeiten Sie mit diesen jungen Künstlern?

Michael: Sicher. Ich hatte schon immer die Einstellung, dass es egal ist, ob es von einem Briefträger oder jemandem, der den Boden kehrt kommt. Ein großartiger Song ist ein großartiger Song. Die tollsten Ideen kommen von ganz normalen Leuten, die einfach nur sagen "Warum probierst du nicht das hier mal aus? Oder jenes hier." Es ist eine tolle Idee, also probiert man sie aus.
Chris Brown ist wundervoll. Akon, er ist ein toller Künstler. Ich wollte immer Musik machen, die eine Generation beeinflusst und inspiriert. Man will dass das, was man kreiert auch lebt. Egal ob es eine Skulptur, ein Gemälde oder Musik ist. Wie Michelangelo sagte: "Ich weiß, der Schöpfer wird irgendwann gehen, aber seine Arbeit lebt weiter. Deshalb stecke ich meine ganze Seele in meine Kunst, um dem Tod zu entrinnen."
Und genauso geht es mir auch. Ich stecke alles von mir in meine Arbeit, denn ich will dass sie lebt.

Ebony: Was für ein Gefühl ist es, zu wissen, dass man die Geschichte verändert hat? Denken Sie oft darüber nach?

Michael: Ja das tue ich, das tue ich wirklich. Ich bin sehr stolz darauf, dass wir Türen geöffnet haben, dass es geholfen hat, vieles nieder zu reißen. Wenn man um die Welt reist und durch die Stadien tourt, sieht man den Einfluss der Musik. Wenn man von der Bühne auf die Menschenmenge sieht, die so groß ist wie das Auge reicht. Es ist ein großartiges Gefühl, aber es kostete auch viel, viel Schmerz.

Ebony: In wiefern?

Michael: Wenn du ganz oben bist, wenn du ein Pionier bist, wollen die Leute dir was. Es ist einfach so. Wer oben ist, dem will man was. Aber ich bin sehr dankbar. All die Rekorde, die best-verkauften Alben, die Nummer 1 Hits - ich bin immer noch dankbar. Ich bin ein Typ, der im Wohnzimmer saß und zuhörte, während mein Vater Ray Charles Platten abspielte. Meine Mutter weckte mich, manchmal um 3 Uhr nachts: "Michael, er ist im Fernsehen, er ist im Fernsehen!" Ich stand auf und rannte zum Fernseher, und da war James Brown. Und ich sagte: "Das will ich auch tun."

Ebony: Können wir uns auf mehr von Michael Jackson freuen?

Michael: Ich schreibe sehr viel im Moment. Ich bin praktisch jeden Tag im Studio. Ich glaube, als Rap anfing - als es losging, dachte ich immer, dass es eine melodischere Wendung nehmen würde. Um es universeller zu machen, denn nicht jeder spricht Englisch. [Er lacht] Und man ist auf sein Land beschränkt. Aber wenn man eine Melodie hat und die Leute können sie mitsummen, dann geht's nach Frankreich, zum Mittleren Osten, überall hin! Überall auf der Welt, denn jetzt fügt man diesen linearen Faden in die Lieder ein. Man muss mitsummen können. Vom irischen Farmer, bis zur Lady, die in Harlem Toiletten schrubbt, bis zu jedem, der mitpfeifen kann, bis zum Kind dass mitschnippt. Man muss es mitsummen können.

Ebony: Sie sind jetzt fast 50. Glauben Sie, Sie werden das hier noch mit 80 machen?

Michael: Ganz ehrlich? Hm, nein. Nicht wie es James Brown tat, oder Jackie Wilson. Sie haben sich einfach totgearbeitet. Ich hätte mir gewünscht, dass [James Brown] am Ende etwas langsamer gemacht und etwas relaxt hätte. So hätte er die Ergebnisse seiner harten Arbeit genießen können.

Ebony: Werden Sie wieder auf Tour gehen?

Michael: Ich mag keine langen Tourneen. Was ich aber am Touren liebe ist, dass es deine Fähigkeiten verfeinert. Das liebe ich am Broadway. Deshalb wenden sich auch Schauspieler dem Broadway zu - weil es das Handwerk verfeinert. Das tut es wirklich. Denn man braucht Jahre, um ein großartiger Entertainer zu werden. Jahre. Man kann nicht einfach jemanden aus der Menge nehmen und ihn in diese Welt werfen und erwarten, dass er mithalten kann. Das würde nie funktionieren. Und das Publikum weiß das, es sieht das. Wie man eine Handbewegung macht, wie man seinen Körper bewegt, wie man mit dem Mikro umgeht, und wie man sich verbeugt. Sie sehen es sofort.

Stevie Wonder zum Beispiel ist ein musikalischer Prophet. Er ist ein weiterer Mensch, den ich benennen muss. Ich habe mir immer gesagt, ich muss mehr schreiben. Ich sah mir [die Produzenten] Gamble und Huff und Hal Davis und die Corporation an, wie sie Hits für die Jackson 5 schrieben. Und ich wollte wirklich die Anatomie davon studieren. Was immer geschah war, dass sie uns holten, um ein Lied zu singen, nachdem sie es fertiggestellt hatten. Und ich war immer traurig, denn ich wollte sehen, wie sie das Lied erstellten. Sie gaben mir also "ABC" nachdem es fertig war, oder "I Want You Back" oder "The Love You Save." Ich wollte es alles erleben.
Und Stevie Wonder ließ mich sprichwörtlich wie die Fliege an der Wand dabeisitzen. So kam es dazu, dass ich dem Album "Songs In The Key Of Life" beim Entstehen zusah - einigen der großartigsten Lieder. Oder ich saß bei Marvin Gaye und... Und das war so die Art Leute, die einfach zu uns kamen und mit uns rumgehangen sind, und mit meinen Brüdern und mir an Wochenenden Basketball spielten. Wir hatten diese Leute immer da. So sah man also die Anatomie und Wissenschaft davon, wie das alles funktioniert, einfach großartig.

Ebony: Sie spielen ja auf einer Weltbühne. Wie sehen Sie die heutige Welt?

Michael: Ich bin sehr besorgt wegen der globalen Erderwärmung. Ich wußte, dass es anstand, aber ich wünschte, man hätte die Aufmerksamkeit der Leute früher bekommen. Es ist aber nie zu spät. Man sagt es ist wie ein außer Kontrolle geratener Zug. Wenn man ihn nicht gleich anhält, kriegt man ihn nie unter Kontrolle. Also müssen wir's in Ordnung bringen und zwar jetzt. Das ist es, was ich mit Liedern wie "Earthsong", "Heal The World" und "We are the World" bewirken wollte, dass sich das Bewusstsein der Leute dafür öffnet. Ich wünschte, die Leute würden jedem der Worte genau zuhören.

Ebony: Was sind Ihre Gedanken zum Thema Präsidentschaftswahl? Hillary, Barrack?

Michael: Um die Wahrheit zu sagen, verfolge ich das nicht. Wir wurden so erzogen. Wenn wir nach den Lösungen der Probleme Welt suchen, suchen wir nicht unter Menschen. Denn sie können es nicht lösen, so sehe ich das. Wir können die Meere nicht kontrollieren, denn so ein Tsunami ist nicht kontrollierbar, es passiert einfach. Wir haben keine Kontrolle über den Himmel, denn wir können die Stürme nicht kontrollieren, sie passieren einfach. Wir sind alle in Gottes Hand und ich denke, dass die Menschheit das bedenken sollte. Ich wünsche mir, dass man mehr für Babys und Kinder tun würde. Das wäre doch großartig, oder?

Ebony: Apropos Babys. Als Vater, schauen Sie doch mal in die Vergangenheit, so 25 Jahre, und sagen Sie uns, was der Unterschied ist, zwischen dem Michael damals und dem Michael heute.

Michael: Der Michael damals ist wohl der selbe Michael wie hier und heute. Ich wollte halt schon immer einige Dinge erreichen. Aber ich hatte auch immer im Hinterkopf, dass ich Kinder haben wollte. Und ich genieße es sehr.

Ebony: Was denken Sie darüber, was man so über Sie schreibt. Was halten Sie davon?

Michael: Ich beachte das nicht. Meiner Meinung nach ist es Ignoranz. Es ist gewöhnlich nicht in Fakten verankert. Es basiert eher, wissen sie, auf Mythos. Der Typ, den man nie wahrhaftig sehen kann. Jede Nachbarschaft hat einen Typen, den man nicht viel sieht. Und über den wird dann hergezogen und getratscht. Es gibt dann Geschichten über ihn, dass er dies oder jenes getan hat. Die Leute sind verrückt!

Ich will einfach nur großartige Musik machen, das ist es, was mich ausmacht.

Aber um nochmal auf Motown 25 zurück zu kommen. Etwas, das mich am meisten berührt hat an der ganzen Sache, das fand nach dem Auftritt statt - ich werde das nie vergessen. Marvin Gaye war backstage und The Temptations und Smokey Robinson und meine Brüder. Sie alle umarmten und küssten mich. Und Richard Pryor kam zu mir und sagte [in einer leisen Stimme]: "Das war der großartigste Auftritt, den ich jemals gesehen habe."
Das war meine Belohnung. Das waren alles Leute, deren Sachen ich mir als Kind in Indiana immer anhörte. Marvin Gaye, The Temptations... Und dass sie mir solche Anerkennung schenken, ich war einfach nur sehr geehrt.
Am nächsten Tag rief Fred Astaire an und sagte: "Ich hab dich gestern gesehen. Ich habe es aufgenommen und habe es mir heute Morgen wieder angesehen. Du bist ein höllisch guter Tänzer! Du hast die Leute gestern Abend vom Hocker gerissen!" Und als ich dann später Fred Astaire sah, macht er die Bewegung mit den Fingern [Michael macht den Moonwalk mit zwei Fingern auf seiner ausgestreckten Hand].

Ich weiß noch ganz genau, wie ich die Performance gemacht habe. Und ich war so enttäuscht hinterher, denn es war nicht so wie ich es wollte. Ich wollte dass es mehr gewesen wäre. Aber nachdem ich dann fertig war, traf ich backstage einen kleinen jüdischen Jungen in einem kleinen Smoking, und er fragte mich [in gebannter Stimme] "Wer hat dir beigebracht, dich so zu bewegen!" [Er lacht] und ich sagte: "Ich denke, Gott... und Übung."

Übersetzung: Been Told für JacksonVillage.org - Wenn ihr das woanders postet, bitte freundlicherweise einen Link zu JacksonVillage.org mit reinstellen!


[Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können]
Nach oben Nach unten
http://recognize-history.forumieren.de
john2

avatar

Anzahl der Beiträge : 190
Anmeldedatum : 31.07.13

BeitragThema: Re: EBONY INTERVIEW    Do 22 Mai 2014 - 8:04

danke
Nach oben Nach unten
Vivienne

avatar

Anzahl der Beiträge : 548
Anmeldedatum : 23.05.13

BeitragThema: Re: EBONY INTERVIEW    Di 27 Mai 2014 - 17:23

Die Sonderausgabe des Ebony Magazins vom Dezember 2007 ist dem 25-jährigen Jubiläum von Thriller gewidmet. Eine wunderbare Ausgabe, die es verdient, näher betrachtet zu werden.

Ebony, das führende Magazin der schwarzen US-Bevölkerung und Michael Jackson, das war eine lebenslange Liebe, von gegenseitigem Respekt gekennzeichnet.

Unzählige Male war Michael auf dem Titel der Ebony zu sehen. Ob noch zusammen mit den Jackson 5, oder später während seiner Solokarriere. Das Ebony Magazin war praktisch sowas wie der Hofberichterstatter von Michael Jackson.

Ebony Interviews vermitteln manchmal sogar ein bisschen das Gefühl, dass Michael sich öffnet, und auch mal was privates rauslässt. Wie z.B. als er mal von Ebony gefragt wurde, ob es eine schwarze Frau in seinem Leben geben würde..... Aber ooops, das ist eine andere Geschichte*. ;) :DDD

In der Tribute Ausgabe von 2009 schreibt Ebony, dass Michael niemals Nein gesagt hat, wann auch immer Ebony eine Anfrage an Michael geschickt hat. Egal ob für ein Photoshooting, eine Reportage, ein Interview, was auch immer. Er hat nie nein gesagt, für Ebony war er immer da.

Wir alle kennen das große Photoshooting, das Matthew Rolston mit Michael im September 2007 für Ebony gemacht hat. Ein Bild daraus ziert das Cover eben dieser Sonderausgabe vom Dezember 2007.

Hier jetzt einmal alle Seiten des Magazins, die Michael-bezogen sind, inklusive des kompletten Interviews.

[Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können] [Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können][Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können][Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können][Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können][Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können][Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können][Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können][Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können][Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können][Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können][Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können][Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können][Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können][Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können][Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können][Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können][Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können][Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können][Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können][Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können][Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können][Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können][Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können] 



*kleiner Nachschlag aus einem Ebony Interview von 1984:

Ebony 1984 magazine interview excerpt 
Zitat :
Ebony: Any Black ladies in your life?
Michael: "Sure, but you wouldn't take me seriously."
Ebony: Try me.
Michael: "It's Diana Ross. I love her."
Ebony: Do you mean as a "big sister?"
Michael: "No, that's not what I mean. See, I told you that you wouldn't take me seriously."
Ebony: You're not saying you'd like to marry Diana Ross, are you?
Michael: "Oh yeah, I'm saying that."
Ebony: But she's so much older than you. You mean you feel something other than close friendship for her?
Michael: "Uh huh. And what does age have to do with it? Look at it this way: how old would you be if you didn't even know hold old you are?"





1984 Ebony Magazin Interview Auszug 
Zitat :
Ebony: Gibt es eine schwarze Frau in deinem Leben?

Michael: "Klar, aber du würdest mich nicht ernst nehmen"

Ebony: Versuch's.

Michael: "Es ist Diana Ross. Ich liebe sie."

Ebony: Du meinst als 'große Schwester'?

Michael: "Nein, das ist es nicht was ich meine. Siehst du, ich habe dir gesagt, du würdest mich nicht ernst nehmen"

Ebony: Du willst aber nicht sagen, dass du Diana Ross heiraten möchtest, oder?

Michael: O ja, genau das meine ich."

Ebony: Aber sie ist so viel älter als du. Willst du sagen, du empfindest etwas anderes als eine tiefe Freundschaft für sie?

Michael: "Uh huh. Was hat das Alter damit zu tun? Sieh es mal so: wie alt wärest du, wenn du nicht wüsstest, wie alt du bist?"


;) :)
Nach oben Nach unten
Arnaud

avatar

Anzahl der Beiträge : 846
Anmeldedatum : 25.04.13

BeitragThema: Re: EBONY INTERVIEW    Di 27 Mai 2014 - 21:59

Danke, Vivienne. :)

Gerade wieder mal bisschen reingelesen … ;) :)

Jepp, die Photos machten damals durchaus Furore, waren auch in der Tat nicht schlecht. Wenngleich sie mir besonders stark bearbeitet erschienen, aber sei es drum. ;) :)

Hab' gerade nochmal reingelesen, um nochmal die Erklärung dafür hervorzuholen, warum ich kaum was zu sagen hätte, wenn man mich bitten würde, dieses damalige Interview zusammenzufassen …

Hehe, jetzt weiß ich's wieder. ;) :)

Ich weiß noch, das einzige, was ich damals davon mitnahm, war Michaels Satz, "Working Day And Night" wäre als Single erschienen, hihi … :D ;) Ich weiß noch, ich fand das seinerzeit schon lustig … Wusste Michael etwa so wenig über seine eigenen Singles Bescheid? ;) :)

Ansonsten … Also um bereits auf die Schnelle, beim bloßen Überfliegen festzustellen, woran dieses Interview krankt, ist die Tatsache, wie oft der Begriff "Thriller" fällt …

Ich habe in den 2000ern einiges bzgl. Michael Jackson nicht verstanden, muss ich sagen …

2003 erzählt er im Bashir-Interview, wie er Billie Jean schrieb, und auch dieses Interview dreht sich derart um Thriller … Es war das Jahr 2007 … Es liest sich ja fast, als war Michael Jackson tatsächlich Geschichte … Sowohl die Interviewer als auch der Interviewte lebten offenbar in der Vergangenheit.

Sein Schaffen scheint nach "Bad" zu Ende gewesen zu sein, die Begriffe "Dangerous", "HIStory", "Blood On The Dance Floor", "Invincible" oder "The Ultimate Collection" fallen kaum bis kein einziges Mal …

Der Künstler lieferte in den 90ern Choreographien, die jene der 80er um einiges toppten – und dennoch wird das Interview so auch hier ad absurdum geführt – der Fast-Fünfzigjährige Michael Jackson ventiliert abermals den unsäglichen Motown-25-Auftritt, der verglichen mit seinen späteren Werken nicht einmal mehr als Rehearsal durchgeht …

Um mal einen sarkastischen Satz der "Black & White" ein wenig abzuwandeln:

Das, was Michael hier erzählt, ist für diejenigen von Relevanz, die seinerzeit in den letzten 25 Jahren im Koma waren …


Mir erschließt sich nach wie vor nicht die offenbar heute noch verbreitete Assoziation Michael Jacksons mit "Thriller" … Ich kann kaum nachvollziehen, was Michael Jackson spätestens ab den 90ern noch mit "Thriller" zu tun gehabt haben soll …

Die ständige Verbindung mit "Thriller" stellt eigentlich im Grunde genommen einen Zynismus und eine Beleidigung dar, und zwar sowohl des Künstlers, als durchaus auch seines Publikums.


Anstatt auf "Speechless", "2000 Watts" oder "We've Had Enough" o.ä. einzugehen – Werke, die zum Zeitpunkt jenen Interviews noch relativ aktuell und diskutierwürdig gewesen wären oder Michaels großartiger Auftritt des Jahres 1999 im Rahmen der beiden MJ & friends - Konzerte, wird abermals "Thriller" durchexerziert …

Na ja. War ja Thriller25, hehe … Aber trotzdem. ;) :)

Diese Rückwärtsgewandtheit war nie so meins in Sachen MJ.
Nach oben Nach unten
john2

avatar

Anzahl der Beiträge : 190
Anmeldedatum : 31.07.13

BeitragThema: Re: EBONY INTERVIEW    Mi 28 Mai 2014 - 6:48

womit du recht hast arnaud. viel mir auch auf.
Hat wohl marketing gründe.
Leider nehm ich das ganze dann auch nicht so ernst, weil es eben nur da ist um schnell ins auge zu fallen.




danke, vivi...wie immer ;-)
Nach oben Nach unten
Vivienne

avatar

Anzahl der Beiträge : 548
Anmeldedatum : 23.05.13

BeitragThema: Re: EBONY INTERVIEW    Fr 30 Mai 2014 - 16:30

Jepp, aus Sicht der Fans habt Ihr natürlich recht, Arnaud und John. Lächeln

Für mich ist diese Ebony Ausgabe eine Tribute Ausgabe, eine Hommage an Michael, und an sein Lebenswerk. 

Ich meine, wir müssen uns auch vor Augen halten, das war im Jahr 2007. Man (und auch Michael selbst) wollte wahrscheinlich an die glorreichen Zeiten erinnern, und das, was sich nach 2005 ins Gedächtnis der Öffentlichkeit eingeprägt hatte, ein bisschen vergessen machen. Und wenn ich mir die komplette Berichterstattung einschließlich der Bilder so ansehe, muss ich sagen, ich finde, das ist gelungen!

Überhaupt die Bilder! Diese Fotosession (erneut mit Matthew Rolston, der über Jahrzehnte hinweg wunderbare Aufnahmen von Michael gemacht hat) ist überhaupt der Hammer. Als ich die Bilder zum ersten mal gesehen habe, konnte ich nicht glauben, dass die erst 2007 entstanden sind. Michael sieht SENSATIONELL aus! Und das ist nicht auf die Bearbeitung der Bilder zurückzuführen. Er sah wirklich sensationell aus, mit einer faszinierenden Aura, die fast greifbar ist. Er wirkt edel und verletzlich zugleich auf diesen Bildern, die Outfits sind erlesen und wunderschön (Dank an Rushka Bergman :) )  

Seit wir im vergangenen Herbst Videomaterial zu den letzten Shootings bekommen haben, können wir ja sehr gut sehen, dass das nicht nur Bildbearbeitung war. Michael war eben einfach wirklich in unglaublich guter Form, äußerlich und anscheinend auch innerlich. :)

So, jetzt habe ich wahrscheinlich zuviel geschwärmt, und Ihr habt ja wie gesagt auch recht, das Interview ist etwas einseitig. Aber ich denke mal, mit dieser Tribute Ausgabe wurde bestimmt Positives für Michael's Image in der Öffentlichkeit bewirkt. Ebenso wie mit der fast zeitgleich erscheinenden L'uomo Vogue (Bruce Weber Shooting). 

:)
Nach oben Nach unten
remember
Admin
Admin
avatar

Anzahl der Beiträge : 1064
Anmeldedatum : 30.10.12
Ort : Aus demselben PLANeten, aus dem MJ kommt

BeitragThema: Re: EBONY INTERVIEW    Sa 31 Mai 2014 - 0:18

Das mit Vergessen: Ich kenne ganz normale Leute, Ende 60-Anf. 70, wäre jetzt der Unterschied zu MJs Alter so 15-18 Jahre. Sie konnten sich nicht an Michael Jackson erinnern. Erst als ich den Gerichtsprozess 2005 gegen Pädophilie erwähnt habe, schimmerte ihnen, wer das war: "Ahhh, der Schwarze, der sich 1000x operiert hat, bis er weiß wurde".  Nix Thriller. Da ist schon zu viel verlangt.

Nicht mal die Assoziation  mit  Musik, Tanz od. Gesang.

Da frage ich mich mit Arnauds Worten: Ob man wohl die letzten 30 Jahre tatsächlich im Koma war.


Ist es nicht sonderbar, dass es Gott (ihm oder ihr) nichts ausmacht, sich in allen Religionen der Welt zu erkennen zu geben, während die Menschen sich immer noch daran klammern, nur ihr Weg (*Religion) sei der richtige?
____________________________
*Anm. "Dancing the Dream", Michael Joseph Jackson
Nach oben Nach unten
Zoey
Admin
Admin
avatar

Anzahl der Beiträge : 1867
Anmeldedatum : 28.10.12
Ort : MJ Air

BeitragThema: Re: EBONY INTERVIEW    Sa 31 Mai 2014 - 0:29

[Sie müssen registriert oder eingeloggt sein, um diesen Link sehen zu können] schrieb:
Das mit Vergessen: Ich kenne ganz normale Leute, Ende 60-Anf. 70, wäre jetzt der Unterschied zu MJs Alter so 15-18 Jahre. Sie konnten sich nicht an Michael Jackson erinnern. Erst als ich den Gerichtsprozess 2005 gegen Pädophilie erwähnt habe, schimmerte ihnen, wer das war: "Ahhh, der Schwarze, der sich 1000x operiert hat, bis er weiß wurde".  Nix Thriller. Da ist schon zu viel verlangt.

Nicht mal die Assoziation  mit  Musik, Tanz od. Gesang.

Da frage ich mich mit Arnauds Worten: Ob man wohl die letzten 30 Jahre tatsächlich im Koma war.
Ja, ist das nicht traurig?
Ich meine, das war der berühmteste Mann der ganzen Welt. Aber bei vielen nur bekannt als "der Freak der vom Schwarzen zum Weißen wurde" oder noch schlimmeres.
Die großartigste Kunst des 20. Jahrhunderts, einer der besten Tänzer die je gelebt haben, Kompositionen die Meisterwerke sind, ein Dichter, ein Maler, ein Sänger - und hängen bleibt der dreckigste Tabloid-Klatsch.
Die Menschheit ist verseucht mit diesem Tabloid-Schwachsinn.
Solche interviews wie das Ebony Interview sind natürlich Gold wert. Aber mir kommt das manchmal so vor wie Tropfen auf den heißen Stein. Die Tabloids haben schon so viel übles angerichtet... traurig


_____________________________________________________________
"The meaning of life is contained in every single expression of life. It is present in the infinity of forms and phenomena that exist in all of creation." Michael Jackson
Nach oben Nach unten
http://www.recognize-history.forumieren.de
Gesponserte Inhalte




BeitragThema: Re: EBONY INTERVIEW    

Nach oben Nach unten
 
EBONY INTERVIEW
Nach oben 
Seite 1 von 1
 Ähnliche Themen
-
» The DUNGEON Thread (deep/minimal dubstep)
» Dabs - KMAG Guest Mix & Interview (03/11)

Befugnisse in diesem ForumSie können in diesem Forum nicht antworten
Recognize HIStory :: HISTORY - ABOUT MICHAEL JACKSON :: MICHAELS REDEN UND INTERVIEWS :: INTERVIEWS VON MICHAEL :: INTERVIEWS VON MICHAEL 2000-2009-
Gehe zu: